DALLAS (KDAF) — AT&T Dream in Black just announced its class of Rising Future Makers.

Officials say 25 students were selected from historically black colleges and universities. These are students who are really making a positive impact on their communities. They received $5,000, a new cell phone with a year of service and so many other gifts.

Inside DFW Host Jenny Anchondo got a chance to meet two of the students and talk about the impact this will have on their careers. Here is her interview with Kalaya Sibley and Cyrai Young

“So after I complete college, I plan on going to med school, because I want to become a forensic pathologist and possibly work for the FBI. I really want to be a forensic pathologist because I really love crime shows. That’s my huge obsession right now. And then on top of that, the statistic for forensic pathologists for Black individuals is less than 10%, while for white individuals is over 70%. So I want to try to help fix that percentage and make it more even. – Cyrai

Next spring, I would like to pursue my law degree with a Juris doctorate to go on and open up my own communications in legal affairs firm. Dream in Black for me is not just a statement, it’s more so of a movement. And so seeing that AT&T was contributing to this movement really inspired me to be a part of it because I wanted to be a part of something that’s a movement, and impactful, not only within HBCUs but within the community as well. – Kalaya

I was ecstatic. As a freshman, I didn’t really think that I had a chance to win, because I didn’t have like a lot in my boat at that point in time. When I got that email back saying congratulations, you were one of the 25 people who were selected, I called my parents as soon as I got it. I was in the middle of class at that time. So as soon as he dismissed us, I ran out that door and I called my parents like, ‘Guess what?’ It was the best feeling ever. – Cyrai

When I got the email, I was like, ‘What?!’ I screenshotted it and I sent it to my parents in our group chat, and they were super excited. So that made me super excited. I also told, like my friend as well, who helped me through the process of application, when it came to recording the video and submitting the video. We were just kind of like, ‘Yay!’ It was something else to kind of check off. It was reaffirming to kind of let me know and other HBCU students know that we are valid in the movements that we do and the work that we do, and the impact that we have on our campuses and within our communities. – Kalaya

Watch the video player above for the full interview.