Simon Says: Why it’s so damn hard to admit being wrong!

So many of you have been emotional lately over the situation at the border.  Kids separated from their parents will do that to you.

It’s a big story that proves there are things in life that shouldn’t get political, and keeping a family together should be on that list.

And then, after days of spin, President Trump signed an Executive Order that, for the time being, will keep kids with their parents.

President Trump signing that thing was a very rare sight. It’s something you don’t often see (like snow in South Florida) because by signing the order, Trump basically admitted he was wrong by changing the border policy.

Although, it feels like his back-pedal was more like this.

It reminded me of how hard it was for “Fonzie” on the TV show Happy Days to say, “ I was wrong.”

Yeah, you get the feeling the word wrong is not part of any White House strategy.

But how wrong is it that it feels like so many people never say they were wrong?

We live in a world where being stubborn is bigger than being wrong.

Think about the stubborn people in your life. You know,  the kind of person that will argue with you that Thanksgiving is on a Friday.

Imagine how these three words--I was wrong--could have possibly saved a marriage, a job, a friendship.

I bet there are people who could have avoided time in jail by admitting a mistake.

You think a war or conflict could have been prevented if someone said they were wrong?

Admitting you’re wrong apparently takes a lot of work.  Studies show it. This one says men won’t do it because of testosterone.

But, c’mon. Sometimes being wrong isn’t being weak--it’s being smart.

Because you’re looking at the big picture, or this week, pictures of little ones not with their mom or dad.

A wrong that hopefully is being made right.