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How to protect your home from lightning strikes

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ALLEN - There is nothing more shocking than seeing lightning lighting up the night sky. In fact,  there are more lightning strikes in July than in any other month, and the property damage adds up to $108 million in the U.S. every year.

“I’ve seen million-dollar mansions be completely burned down to rubble,” Edward Donohue said.

The Donohue family has mounted lightning rods for more 100 years. They say many of us don't think about protecting our homes from lightning until it’s too late.

“A lot of people think lightning comes from the sky, hits, and a ball of fire runs into the ground. That is not what happens,” said Donohue. “If lightning rods are put on, and put on right, you’re never supposed to take a hit. You`re never going to know they are on there.”

Kit Mckee had the lightning rods placed on his home Friday on his home in Allen.

“Honestly, I think it’s something the state should require as code,” Mckee told Newsfix.

McKee made sure to do his research when finding someone to fit his home with the rods. He's seen first hand the damage a bolt of lightning can have.

“Over the last few years I’ve seen many houses affected by lighting, and when I moved into this house, we`re putting a lot of stuff into it spending a lot of money. I didn’t want something to happen to it because of a thunderstorm, which happens all the time.”

Mckee says it has been worth his investment to have these things installed. At the very least, he won't have to deal with the shock of losing his home to lightning.

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