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Another Tent City Bites the Dust as Homeless Move On

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DALLAS - It`s moving day for another tent city in downtown Dallas, tucked under I-45 at Coombs street.

The makeshift camp popped up after the last tent city was bulldozed and closed back in May.

As the city kicks the can down the road, Crisis Intervention Units move in.

“It seems like we’re just going through the motions," Ron Cowart of the  DPD Crisis Intervention Unit explained. "We can’t just say, well it’s the routine. We can’t say, ‘Well, you know what to do.’  We’re on the front lines. We’re down here with people who are homeless for a variety of reasons."

Some of the homeless don’t understand why they have to move again. “If they have a shooting in an apartment complex, sell drugs in an apartment complex, they don’t close that down. But they’re closing us down," said Troy Brown.

“If they have a shooting in an apartment complex, sell drugs in an apartment complex, they don’t close that down. But they’re closing us down," Troy Brown said.

Pastor Lee Cadena has his own theory why the city keeps moving the tent cities out.

“What the city wants to do is split everybody apart so they don’t have (a) big number like they did in this tent city," he said. "There was over a hundred and something people. They’re trying to sort them out where there would be twenty, thirty people, so no one would really care about them being down there."

The city says they help homeless people one-on-one, but as a group, it's a bigger problem.

“Once we get them in the system we can take care of them," Cowart said. "But as a large group, we are facing having to just move them to move them."

This time there was no dramatic stand-off like when Pastor Lee and his wife Diana chained themselves to a pillar to negotiate a meeting with the city back in may.

“Nothing ever came out of it. We didn't get a meeting in front of city council. It seems like they didn’t want to hear our voice about the homeless," said Diana Cadena.

Meanwhile the people of tent city may be homeless, but they do know where they are going next. They plan on calling Haskel Avenue under Interstate 30 home for now. At least until the city kicks the can down the road again.

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