More Than Hair: The Impact of Natural Hair

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DALLAS -- February is the month of love and the month we, as a nation, celebrate black history. And during this time, much of the focus is on slavery or famous black inventors.

But Black History Month is so much more than that.

When you think about the African-American culture, one thing that stands out is hair, literally! And a movement that started in the late 60s has gotten quite a bit of momentum lately. The movement known as "going natural."

Just look at hair product sales: According to research from Mintel, the sales of relaxers only accounted for 21% of black hair care products.

But why the decline?

"I think it's a little bit bigger than that. It allows you to be exactly who God created you to be. This is who we are. And we don't have to assimilate to anybody else. We are created just like this. So this is what we're supposed to do, so it's just easier to do," says Catakalizmic Healthy Hair stylist Cassandra Wilder. She's been doing hair for 15 years and knows a thing or two about natural hair, especially considering she is natural herself.

Within the African-American community, hair has become a major topic of discussion. From whether black women should wear their hair relaxed or natural to whether natural hair is "too abrasive" or "unprofessional."

"I don't believe in you having good hair or you have bad hair. I believe you have the hair that you've been blessed with. And each hair strand is different. That's your unique makeup," Wilder says.

But is natural hair just a style or does it go deeper than that?

"As far as being natural, I think it's really just about embracing you," says Wilder.

That being said, the texture of someone's hair has just as little to do with their personality... as the color of their skin.