Obama Trumps Trump in Final State of the Union

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 12: U.S. President Barack Obama delivers the State of the Union speech before members of Congress in the House chamber of the U.S. Capitol January 12, 2016 in Washington, DC. In his last State of the Union, President Obama reflected on the past seven years in office and spoke on topics including climate change, gun control, immigration and income inequality. Also pictured are Vice President Joe Biden (L) and U.S. Speaker of the House Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI). (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

JANUARY 12: U.S. President Barack Obama delivers his final State of the Union speech

WASHINGTON, DC — The last hurrah. President Obama delivered his final State of the Union address Tuesday night. That either brings sadness or great joy, depending on which political party you rock with.

President Obama came out swinging at GOP-front runner Donald Trump.  He didn’t call him out by name… but he might as well have… as he slammed the billionaire’s proposed plans for Muslims, Mexicans and others.

“We need to reject any politics that targets people because of race or religion. This isn’t a matter of political correctness,” President Obama said. “It’s a matter of understanding what makes us strong.”

On ISIS…

“If this Congress is serious about winning this war, and wants to send a message to our troops and the world, you should finally authorize the use of military force against ISIL. Take a vote,” he said, urging Congress to work together.

But South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley delivered the Republican response and offered a very different perspective.

“We are facing the most dangerous terrorist threat our nation has seen since September 11th, and this President appears either unwilling or unable to deal with it,” Gov. Haley said.

Regardless…

“I believe in change, because I believe in you — the American people,” President Obama said. “And that’s why I stand here as confident as I’ve ever been, that the State of our Union is strong.”

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.