Hood County Sees Controversy With Same-Sex Marriage Licensing

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

GRANBURY - Since the Supremes said 'We do' last week, same-sex couples across the country have been gettin' hitched.  But that's not the case in every county in Texas.

Clerks in Parker, Wise, and Johnson Counties are waiting until gender-neutral forms are created and approved.

But in Hood County, Clerk Katie Lang says she won't issue any same-sex marriage licenses -- because of her religious convictions.

She turned down our interview request, but issued a statement saying: "This newly invented federal constitutional right to same-sex marriage should peaceably coexist alongside longstanding constitutional and statutory rights, including the rights to free exercise of religion and speech."

And it looks like they will peaceably coexist, even right there in Hood County.  A new statement from Lang on the Hood County Clerk website says "As soon as forms are printed, the Hood County Clerk's office will have staff available and ready to issue same-sex marriage licenses."  But Lang won't be issuing them herself.

Folks who live in Granbury are divided on the issue, with some citing Biblical concerns with the morality of homosexual relations, and others stressing the need for love and acceptance of all.

The Plano-based Liberty Institute says they stand ready to defend folks like Ms. Lang, should anyone take legal action against them.

Said Chelsey Youman from the Institute, "We can all agree that the government shouldn't compel any individual to act against their religious beliefs."

But not all lawyers agree with Ms. Lang's approach.

"Everyone has a right to their view," said attorney Rayla Allison, "However, it should not affect their official function."

Looks like it'll take a while for the dust to settle on this monumental issue, but all across Texas, there are plenty of counties who are saying 'Yes' to the Supreme Court's ruling.

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.