High-Tech UTA Tool Could Reduce Potholes!

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DALLAS - We asked you to tell us about the worst potholes in North Texas and you came through. So, when we featured our rough rides, the city got out and fixed 'em, pronto. Right?

Ha!

We took you to Elm & Lamar in downtown Dallas at the beginning of May. Two weeks later, it's still there, still taking its toll on tires.

Well, how about the one at Swiss & Washington? Yeah, you really had to swerve to avoid some serious damage. Three weeks later, city crews still need to swerve by and fix this one. It's still afflicting our alignments.

Then in northeast Dallas at Shiloh & Ferguson, we found what a guy named Mike called "Potholezilla."

"I think there's some lost children, maybe Jimmy Hoffa down there. I'm not sure," Mike said. He didn't want to tell us his last name. Maybe that's lost in the Potholezilla, too.

But just one week later, it looks like city crews found time to fill that pothole. You can't call it, "good as new." Let's just call it, "good enough."

This might be the solution to our pothole problems. It's called an accelerated pavement testing machine, and UT Arlington has the only one in Texas.

"You have a full-sized truck axle that goes back and forth 100,000 times in a week," said Dr. Stefan Romanoschi of the UT Arlington Department of Civil Engineering.

That means researchers can see how various kinds of pavement hold up. One month in the tester equals about 10 years of real world wear and tear on roads.

While they're figuring out what works best, we've still got plenty of potholes to deal with. If you know of a bad one, hit us up on our Facebook page and we could make that our next Pothole of the Day!