Game In Hand: All Eyes on DeMarco’s Left Hand

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VALLEY RANCH--There`s a collection of some of the most famous hands in sports history at Baylor University Medical Center.

Staubach, Aikman and Emmitt Smith all have their digits bronzed here, but the most famous hand in DFW right now isn`t in this collection of casts, it's at Valley Ranch in a special cast of its own.

Yeah, all eyes are still on DeMarco Murray`s broken left hand, and whether the league`s leading rusher will be on the field for the near must-win game against the Colts, Sunday.

“I’m out here just trying to do what I can to help this team” said Murray, who is just 86 yards shy of breaking Emmitt Smith’s team record for rushing yards in a season.

“I’m going to work hard and do whatever it takes. We’ll see Sunday.”

So Murray and the Boys are holding out hope, but for a broader look we went straight to an expert to find out what this injury is all about.

“This fracture occurs in everybody.” said Dr. John Westkaemper, an orthopedist at Baylor Las Colinas. “I’ve seen it in high school level athletes. I’ve seen it in community tennis players.  This is a very common injury.”

But what if one of us suffered this same fracture? Could we even do our 'pencil pushing' jobs?

“You might be able to be back at work within two to three weeks,” Dr. Westkaemper said.

Well in two weeks the Cowboys season is over if they don’t pick up wins. So what’s it going to take for DeMarco to be on the field?

“It all comes down to risk” said Dr. Westkaemper who deals in sports medicine, “I’ll talk to the parent, I’ll talk to the student. Are they a starter? Are they a backup? Is the team going to make the playoffs or they 1 and 10?”

Well Murray is in a playoff race, so you get the feeling it’s “all hands on deck” come Sunday.

And based on the way he 's playing, and what he might play through, Murray may find his hands immortalized at Baylor University Medical Center one day.

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