Pitch Perfect: Former MLB Pitcher Developing Medical Chip

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

DALLAS, TX -- It didn't take long for Will Rosellini to realize he was out of his league. He was pitching for Arizona Diamondbacks in the minors and saw other power house pitchers, like Randy Johnson, throw the ball with amazing precision.

“When I saw Randy Johnson`s power and consistency, I realized I would never be a pitcher like he was in the big leagues," Rosellini said.

That's when he decided to take a scientific approach to find out why he wasn’t on his game.

“It turned out it wasn`t my arm or my muscles, it had to do with my brain, and the way my nervous system was able to repeat the mechanics over and over again.”

So, at age 22, he hung up his glove and went back to school. It didn't take long before he scored six advanced degrees. On top of that, he’s about to finish his Ph.D in neuroscience.

Fast forward to today -- Rosellini is now the Director of Technology and Commercialization at U.T. Dallas, and he's pitching a micro chip that could help with a long list of neurological disorders like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's

“We think we are close to having, if not us, a number of companies having a number of exciting advances to treat neurological diseases that previously were left to the patients own suffering,” Rosellini explained. “When you go into a mechanic they can diagnose you with a computer, and we think in 20 years that will be something more common than it is today.”

Rosellini says we may not be ready for a health care hardware store, but he thinks he's hit a home run with this new technology.