What’s Next? Quarantine Ending for Thomas Duncan’s Fiancee

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DALLAS—No doubt the past 19 days haven't been easy for Louise Troh, Thomas Duncan’s fiancee. Troh and three others have been under quarantine for two weeks.

“There’s grief and there’s tremendous loss and you've got to figure out, how am I going to pick up.”

Associate Pastor Mark Wingfield keeps regular contact with Louise. She's a member of Wilshire Baptist Church in Dallas. Louise's time in isolation is coming to an end, but her post-Ebola reality is just beginning.

“You know, will people be afraid of them?” Wingfield asked.  “Will they be welcoming to them? And I think these are the questions that we as a community need to be asking. Will we let reason guide our actions more than fear?”

Ebola took the life of her fiance and forced her into a life of seclusion as she was monitored daily for the deadly virus. Sunday, her incubation period expires.

What will happen to Louise?  Her life will be haunted by a virus, her future will be without the man she loved, and some questions are still left unanswered.

“Everything’s gone,” Wingfield said.  “And so how do we rebuild that for them in a way that is kind?  I do not think they will be going back to their old apartment.”

But even in the midst of her personal darkness, there is light.  Fellow church members and folks from all over the U.S. are showing their love and support.

“They’ve been a tremendous encouragement to her,” he said.  “Too often the church, historically, has been at odds with science, and this is a time where we need to listen to science.  A message of faith over fear.”

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