Ebola Lessons Learned: Breaking Down What Went Wrong in Dallas

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DALLAS—With two Dallas nurses now diagnosed with Ebola some folks are asking -- “What went wrong in how the virus was handled in Dallas?”

“Hindsight is always 20/20,” Dallas County Health and Human Services Director Zachary Thompson said.

Turns out, there was a big difference in how Dallas County Health Officials handled folks exposed to Ebola, compared to Presbyterian and the CDC.

“48 people that the Dallas Health and Human Services have been monitoring are symptom free to date and that’s good.  What was left out of the equation was the healthcare workers, in terms of looking at the control orders. They were just as critical.”

The 77 healthcare workers were basically asked to monitor themselves, while the folks who were exposed to Thomas Eric Duncan have been quarantined for more than two weeks.

“To date, they have not had any symptoms, but you have two healthcare workers who have been confirmed with the Ebola virus.”

Thompson isn’t pleased about the fact that the second nurse who tested positive for Ebola, Amber Vinson, hopped on a plane from Ohio with a low grade fever.

“It should’ve been very clear.  You should not have traveled,” Thompson said.

The CDC gave her the green light, even though another nurse had been diagnosed the day before.

“Our top doc, Dr. Perkins should have been contacted concerning that matter.”

Now the 100 plus other people that were on that plane are on the edge of their seats.

“Now, what an impact that’s had…Now, we have that state asking questions. It’s no longer a practice.  This is real. And every decision that you make, you don’t get a do over,” Thompson said.