Celina firefighter sprung into action on Flight 1380

CELINA -- In every tragedy, there are heroes. We've learned about another North Texan who went above and beyond during the Southwest flight 1380 tragedy.

"For some reason, whatever reason that is, it was me that day," Celina firefighter Andrew Needum said. "God created a servant heart in me and I felt a calling to get up and do something."

He was on that flight with his family. He helped people around him with the oxygen masks.

Then he saw what was happening on row 14.

Jennifer Riordan had been partially sucked through a broken window.

"I looked at her eyes," Needum said, looking at his wife. "She basically gave me the approval to go back there. In fact, I think she may have told me to go."

Riordan didn't survive and you can hear in Needum's voice: it haunts him.

"I feel for her family. I feel for her two kids, her husband, the community that she lived in," Needum said. "I can't imagine what they're going through."

Investigators have been inspecting the engine, a CFM56-7B. An FAA directive will require that many of them be inspected with an ultrasound to check out the fan blades.

The manufacturer had reportedly recommended inspections for those fan blades within a year. Southwest had asked for more time and, at that point, the inspections weren't required by the FAA.

Investigators will also travel to Southwest headquarters in Dallas to search through the plane's records.

"They can go back to these detailed images and characterize: where did it start from, was there something at that location that started the process, and how did the crack grow," said Rajiv Mishra, a metal fatigue expert.  He's a professor in the College of Engineering at the University of North Texas.

The goal is to be sure nothing like this ever happens again. But if it does, you sure want a guy like Andrew Needum sitting near you.