Facebook scandal unravels as Zuckerberg prepares for Congress meeting

WASHINGTON, D.C.-- Monday is the day Facebook and CEO Mark Zuckerberg start to clean the giant mess from a data scandal involving Cambridge Analytica.

If you use the social media network, you'll soon see a notice when you log-in. That notice will include a link to show info applications you have access to.

About 87 million users will also get a much more detailed message about how their information was compromised. This all started when the data firm got hold of private info from millions of Facebook users.

The whistle-blower who started it all, Christopher Wylie, claims if it weren't for Cambridge Analytica's influence, the UK never would've voted for Brexit.

The Federal Trade Commission is getting involved and Zuckerberg is in the spotlight. He's set to speak to congress twice this week, with one clear message: it's his fault.

"It's clear now that we didn't do enough to prevent these tools from being used for harm as well," Zuckerberg said.

It's unclear whether that message will actually get through because it seems some people in the White House are more concerned about Zuckerberg's appearance than what he has to say.

"Is he going to wear a suit and tie and a clean white shirt? That's my biggest question," Chief Economic Advisor Larry Kudlow said.  "Is he going to behave like an adult, major corporate leader or give me this phony bologna, what is it hoodies and dungarees?"

While the investigation continues, some are deactivating their relationship with Facebook. Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak now says he's deleting his account. It seems he'd likely give the company a thumbs down for the drama.