Conservative Move wants to help right-leaning families find happy homes

MCKINNEY -- When deciding where you should live, Paul Chabot has one key.

"It really should come down to one simple, common question: what kind of place do you want to raise your family?" he said Tuesday.

Chabot found himself asking that question back in November after he lost a California Congressional race.

"That was pretty much the breaking point for my wife and I, saying, 'Look, we're just beating our head against the wall,'" he remembered.

Disenchanted with Liberal policies he couldn't stomach in the Golden State, Chabot left his blues in California and chased a Conservative dream in red hot Collin County, Texas. If he wanted to make a splash, he picked a desirable destination.

"Collin County is the number one economy in the state of Texas," Texas realtor Derek Baker said.

After the move, Chabot kept noticing how many California converts there were in his new Lone Star life. The neighbor down the street, the guy at Home Depot, the mail man.

That's when the light bulb turned on, and Conservative Move was born.

"We simply said, why don't we create a venture out of this?" he said. "Why don't we create a business in helping families leave blue states and move to red states?"

He joined up with Baker, the man he first contacted to ask about Texas, and the idea turned into reality.

Now, the obvious question is, if we're making this political, why wouldn't they move Republicans to swing states instead of a Conservative stronghold like Texas?

The answer is more about thriving family environments and less about creating change.

"The reason they're moving here isn't necessarily a political philosophy, but it's because of the things that every family likes," Baker said. "They want the good schools and the safe streets and the low taxes. Well, those are conservative policies."

If it just so happens to keep Texas redder than the ketchup on President Trump's steak, that's just icing on the cake for this group.

"I would not have moved from a blue state to another blue state, so I do hope that Conservative Move does that. I hope it does help Texas stay red," Chabot said.

With thousands of inquiries already since its May launch, Conservative Move has tapped a nerve, but by fleeing blue for red or vice versa, are we risking putting ourselves in even bigger bubbles than before?

Chabot actually sees it just the opposite in Conservative utopian future.

"The electorate, the families there, at some point will no longer have to leave," he said. "They'll be able to have these greater conversations with their elected officials and put people in office who will look out for the best interests of kids and community. 10-15 years from now, hopefully, some of these blue states we look at today might not be as blue."