What to expect in North Texas during eclipse

ARLINGTON — We’re just about a month away from an amazing celestial event. The Great American Eclipse will pass over the entire U.S. on August 21, but why is it such a big deal?

“Earth actually experiences two to five solar eclipses per year, but most of the eclipses occur in uncivilized areas or in the middle of oceans,” said Levent Gurdemir, the director of the UT Arlington Planetarium. “The United States, for example, the last total solar eclipse was 38 years ago.”

Parts of the country will get a total eclipse, with the entire sun being blotted out by the moon, but what will the show look like here?

“North Texas is far away from the totality path so it’s not going to experience the total solar eclipse, but 75% of the sun will be covered,” Gurdemir explained.“North Texas is far away from the totality path so it’s not going to experience the total solar eclipse, but 75% of the sun will be covered,” Gurdemir explained.

So we won’t get the full thing here, but the good news is that we won’t have to wait long for total eclipse here in the Metroplex. In April of 2024, another eclipse will pass over the country and this time North Texas will get a full solar blackout.

But a lot of folks won’t wait that long. Thousands of "eclipse tourists" are expected to travel to the path of the of the eclipse.

“My opinion is, if I had the chance, I would travel to see both of them,” said Gurdemir. “Because this is almost a once in a lifetime event.”

So mark your calendars and on August 21 make sure you’re looking up--with the proper eye protection of course!