The Bachelor brings interracial relationships into Prime time

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DALLAS -- You remember the 1991 lyrics from the King of Pop. "If you're thinkin' of being my baby, it don't matter if you're black or white."

That's all well and good, but as we know it hasn't always been that way!

"We're seeing it on TV, we're seeing it on the media, social media, and so it is being accepted," said dating expert and author Donna Arp Weitzman. "However, I still think there's an undercurrent that it's not as accepted as we'd like."

This June marks 50 years since the Supreme Court ruled interracial dating was legal, and it's been a gradual climb since then for couples who want to cross those lines. Monday night, one of our favorite guilty pleasures, The Bachelor, got real with black contestant and Dallas native Rachel Lindsay bringing white bachelor Nick Viall home to meet Mom.

Rachel admitted the previous week that she'd never brought a white guy home, but that it wouldn't be a problem. She started Nick at predominantly black Concord Church in Dallas, where he was introduced by Pastor Bryan Carter as Rachel's boyfriend. It's not the pastor's opinion that's a game changer, though. Relationships many times come down to the approval of parents, maybe even more so in an interracial situation.

"I don't know if they worry about society as much as their parents," Weitzman said. "I think they do worry about their parents perhaps."

Rachel's mom actually said Nick reminded her of her own husband, blowing away her daughter with the comment. Of course, Rachel's already been revealed as the next Bachelorette, so we know this one's not going to work out.

As for everyone else, it looks like we're good and getting better. Maybe still be careful with green though.

"You have to kiss a lot of frogs, but keep kissing, kissing, kissing," Weitzman laughed.