Not All College Parents Are Worried About Campus Carry

ARLINGTON -- It was a 'Sunday! Sunday! Sunday!' kind of feel at UT Arlington Sunday. They had a veritable pistol-palooza all over campus as freshmen moved in, opening the first semester of school since Campus Carry went into law.

Of course, that would've been quite a story if any of it had really happened.

Actually, though, it was like any other move in day for 17- and 18-year-old kids. They hauled suitcases, pillows, lamps, and refrigerators. Then they tried to duck out of the hot Texas sun.

It turns out, Campus Carry is off to a reassuringly slow start.

“I don’t think they ever intended for every Tom, Dick, and Harry to be carrying like the Old West," said Kyle Winkler, a dad moving in his freshman daughter. "I think just like the Open Carry, it will be a non-issue."

Okay, so let's try this all again.

With classes starting at many public colleges this week, we'll start to see our first effects of Campus Carry, the law that allows concealed handguns on college campuses.

For some students, it's not the most comfortable feeling.

“I would feel better about it if they did put in a psychiatric evaluation, speaking as a young student where suicide is one of the top causes of death," said senior Jacob Bell.

For at least one parent, though, it's no worry at all.

“To actually carry, you do have to be 21, and that eliminates most college students," Winkler pointed out. "Until you’re a junior or senior, you’re not allowed to carry."

You do have to be 21 to carry. There's also a big difference between concealed carry and open carry. This means your gun is not to be visible at any time. Many places on campus, including sports and counseling buildings, are completely off limits too, not allowing any weapons inside.

As The Maverick Way becomes a little more gun friendly, is it really going to have any effect on our kids?

“Hope not!" Bell laughed. "I don’t think so. I hope not."

And that's kinda the point, isn't it?