Parkland Clinic Defends Kicking Out Woman With Service Dog

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GARLAND -- When Lauren Lee showed up at the Parkland Acute Response Clinic in Garland Monday, she says she was denied medical treatment because of Athena, her service dog.

"The head nurse came out asking me for proof of certification," Lee explained.

Lee says he gave the nurse her service dog ID card and her tag. When Lee refused to leave, she says Parkland called the cops.

parkland dog

Lauren Lee Recorded the Encounter on Her Cell Phone.

When the police showed up, she started recording. The video shot on her cell phone shows Lee confronting an employee and a Garland officer.

"They pretty much were telling me that unless I prove my service of my dog that I am denied care and access to them," Lee said. "They tell me no matter what, I'm not allowed to be seen at their facility with my service animal."

Lee says she needs Athena to help her deal with PTSD brought on, she says, by an attack she survived in 2012.

"With my PTSD, I go into triggers. I either go into black outs or I go into episodes and so she is trained to figure out which one and she gets me out of them," Lee said.

The Parkland Acute Response Clinic sent NewsFix a statement with their side of the story. They say, "The pit bull began growling at other patients and was unresponsive to owner's commands."

They say Parkland does allow service animals in its facilities but "must not pose a danger to others. Our staff acted appropriately."

Lee believes she was denied care because Athena is a pit bull and says she just wants the treatment she needs for her tumors.

"I have my stepson, my youngest son who is three, and my daughter who is seven," Lee said. "They are my world I want nothing but a life with them."