What is ‘African Amedia?’ Tackling Media Stereotypes Through Art

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FAIR PARK – For many, there’s a love/hate relationship with the media. Not only with what is televised and put on the Internet but how people are portrayed negatively, especially African-Americans.

Well, one person is looking to shed light on these stereotypes through art. Through African Amedia.

"African Amedia came to me about three years ago,” Adu said. Adu is the artist and curator of African Amedia. "I wanted to do an exhibit that really dealt with police brutality, but more so specifically how African-Americans were being perceived through the media in general."

Adu added, "It's almost like you're walking into a television studio. That's why it's called African Amedia. But there are multiple channels, and so each channel deals with something that is very relevant today."

From Channel Two that depicts a series including Mike Brown on white TVs with a black background, to a controversial piece built to encourage millennial protestors.

"I thought it'd be great to have something here that says 'hey, don't sit ya black ass down, keep on doing what you're doing,’” Adu said.

The exhibit also includes an installation that pays homage to the 4 Little Girls killed in the Alabama church bombing back in 1963. And a PSA which paints the picture of the sexualization of Black women over the years.

African Amedia is available at Dallas’ African American Museum until October 31.

Here’s hoping the message will last beyond that.

"When people come, I'm hoping that there is conversation about why Black lives matter,” Adu said.