Second Powerful Quake Kills More in Nepal

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Latest developments:

• A U.S. military helicopter “was declared missing”Tuesday while in Nepal to support earthquake relief efforts there, U.S. Navy Capt. Chris Sims said. The UH-1 Huey helicopter had six U.S. Marines and two Nepalese aboard at the time, Pentagon spokesman Col. Steve Warren said. Radio transmissions indicated its crew was having some type of fuel problem before it went missing, said Warren, who added the U.S. government is “hopeful” the aircraft didn’t crash but doesn’t know.

• At least 50 people have died in Nepal because of the latest large earthquake there, police spokesman Kamal Singh Bam told CNN late Tuesday. Nepalese government spokesman Minendra Rijal earlier said that another 1,261 people have been injured. Thirty-two of the Asian nation’s 75 districts were affected.

• At least 17 people in India have also died as a result of the tremor, Home Ministry spokesman Kuldeep Dhatwalia told CNN. Sixteen of those deaths were in Bihar state, with the other in Uttar Pradesh. And a woman in Tibet, which is part of China, also was killed when falling rocks hit her car as it traveled through Gyirong, China’s state-run Xinhua news agency reported. In the same report, police officer Wu Aijun said that landslides had cut off some roads in the area.

• Aftershocks continue pre-dawn Wednesday in Nepal as a CNN team there feels one such big one at 2 a.m. local time, shaking buildings and terrifying survivors, many of whom were sleeping outside or ran from their homes.

Full Story:

NEPAL — Just over two weeks after thousands died in a mammoth earthquake, Nepal got hit hard again Tuesday — with another powerful tremor that has left dozens more dead, more than 1,000 injured and questions about what’s next for the already traumatized Asian nation.

The fact that Nepal just endured a similar horror, not to mention waves of aftershocks that followed, didn’t diminish Tuesday’s damage or shock. More buildings collapsed, more landslides rumbled and more people scrambled for their lives.

“For the first seconds, it was complete silence. By the fifth second, everybody started to scream,” said Marc Sarrado, a 41-year-old documentarian from Spain who was in Nepal’s Nuwakot Valley, about two hours northwest of Kathmandu, when the quake hit.

“It was really, really intense. Even when the shaking stopped, people were still screaming. They were completely panicked, because they knew exactly what it was.”

Tuesday’s magnitude-7.3 earthquake struck about 9.3 miles (15 kilometers) deep, the U.S. Geological Survey said. For comparison’s sake, the magnitude-7.8 quake on April 25 — which killed more than 8,000 — was centered east of, rather than west of Kathmandu and a little farther away (50 miles). That earlier tremor was also more than three times bigger and 5.6 times stronger, in terms of energy released, according to the USGS.

So, yes, it could have been worse. But that doesn’t mean it wasn’t dangerous.

Nepalese police spokesman Kamal Singh Bam said at least 50 people in his country had died as of late Tuesday night. More than 1,260 had been counted as injured at that point, with dozens having been rescued alive from rubble, according to government spokesman Minendra Rijal.

The carnage wasn’t confined to Nepal. China’s state-run Xinhua news agency reported that a woman in Tibet died Tuesday afternoon after falling rocks hit her car. At least 17 more people died in northeastern India, according to Indian Home Ministry spokesman Kuldeep Dhatwalia.India’s military was also involved inside Nepal, caring for casualties and flying them by helicopter from the village of Mrigu to Kathmandu.